Sign up to our Editors Choice newsletter now! Click here

Opinion: New kids on the block must give the housing establishment food for thought

Accessibility Menu

Menu Search

24dash - The UK's most up-to-date social housing and public sector news website

Opinion: New kids on the block must give the housing establishment food for thought

24DASH.COM Logo

Published by Jon Land for 24dash.com in Housing

Opinion: New kids on the block must give the housing establishment food for thought Opinion: New kids on the block must give the housing establishment food for thought

By Paul Taylor, Bromford's innovation coach and curator of the top 50 digital Power Players list

2pm 11th June: London grinds to a halt. Cab drivers have downed tools for an hour. Uber, a smartphone app that offers an easy and cheap taxi booking service, has rolled into the UK.

Our taxi drivers, required to do training of between 4-7 years, are understandably outraged at this tech start-up rocking up and suggesting services can be delivered in affordable ways that are more tailored to the customer.

The howls of anguish from the striking drivers were heard all across Europe. But far from highlighting the cause of taxi drivers it served only to promote Uber itself- which saw an 850% increase in subscriptions.

The hackney carriage - a tradition dating back to 1654 – faces potential disruption.

Plenty of howls of anguish in Manchester too this week as the annual conference rolled into town.

This year though the conference had an Uber-like start-up to contend with. House Party - the unofficial fringe - had parked its (mini)bus just over the road.

Much like Comms Hero, it would be easy to dismiss House Party as a bit of inconsequential fluff. A bunch of malcontents fiddling around with social media and shiny tech whilst Rome burns.

But both formats deserve closer scrutiny. Both have super smart business brains behind them in Asif Choudry and Matt Leach. Both have got the sheer balls to deliver something different in a market starved of original thought.

And both show an implicit understanding of their customers. Comms Hero was developed after speaking to Comms people and asking them what they would design if they could create their ideal event.

House Party has evolved through social media connections and captured the imagination of people who would never have thought of attending a housing conference. Additionally it’s been co-designed by Esther Foreman a social entrepreneur who also happens to be – guess what? – a real life housing association tenant.

And they are new and achingly cool. Whereas the annual CIH conference has roots in a tradition starting back in 1931.

On that basis it's unfair to compare and contrast the three. But anyone who has attended them, or followed their social media feeds, will do so.

Let me be clear. This isn't an attack on the CIH, an organisation I have huge respect for and who employ some inspirational people. Neither is it a ringing endorsement of Comms Hero or House Party - concepts that are taking their first awkward baby steps into the world.

But the fact is the annual conference has to change.

You can't blame the CIH. The public gets what the public wants. And, if we’re honest, the UK housing public wants an annual sideshow to the real business of getting together and having a chinwag and a few beers.

The conference this year certainly had a unified message: We need more social housing and we need more money. We need more of the same. Impassioned stuff and I, optimistically, hope it's heard.

But at £525 for a one day non-member ticket you'd expect passion at the very least.

How attractive would this be to people in the top 5 of the digital Power Players list. People like Anne McCrossan, John Popham or Helen Reynolds? Sole traders who could help the sector be much better than it currently is.

How attractive would this be to a tenant?

Comms Hero has undercut its rivals by a good £100. House Party offered a 'pay what you can afford' option.

Much like ‘affordable’ rents, our conferences need to consider their pricing and accessibility. Thom Bartley has made the brilliant point that it's now cheaper to fly to Amsterdam to see a 3D printed house than to pay to go to a housing conference and hear someone talk about it.

We all know that housing has to revisit its purpose but that also involves a restatement of its values.

This is less an issue for the CIH or the Nat Fed than it is for the sector itself.

In reality neither Comms Hero nor House Party are competitors to traditional conferences - just a different take on the way we engage people. The annual conference, just like black cabs, will be around for a good while yet.

But if nothing else the new kids on the block have made us consider "would we do it this way if we started again?"

And that’s always a pretty good question to ask.

Comments

Login and comment using one of your accounts...